Carl Eby

Academic Specialty:

American Literature, 1830-1945, Transatlantic Modernism, Psychoanalysis

Office Hours:

Tuesdays & Thursdays, 1:00pm-2:00pm
Mondays & Wednesdays, 11:00am-12:00pm & by appointment

Education:

  • Ph.D., University of California, Davis, 1995
  • M.A., University of California, Davis, 1991
  • B.A., University of California, Davis, 1987

Selected Publications:

Books

  • Hemingway’s Fetishism: Psychoanalysis and the Mirror of Manhood. Series: Psychoanalysis and Culture. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1999.
  • Hemingway's Spain: Imagining the Spanish World. Co-editor: Mark Cirino. Kent State University Press, 2016.
  • Reading Hemingway's The Garden of EdenSeries: ReadingHemingway. Gen. Ed. Mark Cirino. Kent State UP, under contract.

Articles and Chapters

  • The Sea Change." Reading Hemingway's Winner Take Nothing. Eds. Cirino and Vandagriff. Kent State UP. Forthcoming, 2018.
  • "Gardens of Eden and Earthly Delights: Hemingway, Bosch, and the Prado." The Hemingway Review. Forthcoming, 2018.
  • "Reading Hemingway Backwards: Teaching A Farewell to Arms in Light of The Garden of Eden." In Hemingway and Gender. Ed. Verna Kale. Forthcoming from Kent State University Press, 2016. 104-114.
  • “Who Is ‘The Destructive Type’?: Re-reading Literary Jealousy and Destruction in The Garden of Eden.” The Hemingway Review. 33.2 (2014)
  • “Literary Movements.” In Hemingway in Context. Eds. Debra A. Moddelmog and Suzanne del Gizzo. Cambridge University Press, 2013. 173-182.
  • “‘Come Back to the Beach Ag’in, David Honey!’: Hemingway’s Fetishization of Race in The Garden of EdenManuscripts” Reprinted in The Garden of Eden: Twenty-Five Years of Criticism. Eds. Suanne del Gizzo and Fred Svoboda. Kent State UP, 2012.
  • “Teaching Modernist Temporality with The Garden of Eden.” The Hemingway Review. 30.1 (2010): 116-121.
  • “Wake Up Alone and Like It!: Dorothy Hollis, Marjorie Hillis, and To Have and Have Not.” The Hemingway Review 26.1 (2006): 96-105.
  • “‘He Felt the Change So that It Hurt Him All Through’: Sodomy and Transvestic Hallucination in Late Hemingway.” The Hemingway Review 25.1 (2005): 77-95.
  • “Understanding What Was Lost at Mons: Teaching The Sun Also Rises from a Psychobiographical Perspective.” In Teaching The Sun Also Rises. Ed. Peter L. Hays. Boise: University of Idaho Press, 2003. 297-323.
  • “Hemingway, Tribal Law, and the Identity of the Widow in True at First Light.” The Hemingway Review 21.2 (2002): 146-151.
  • “Hemingway’s Truth and Tribal Politics,” in forum, “First Perspectives on True at First Light.” The Hemingway Review 19.1 (1999): 24-27.
  • “A Farewell to Arm: Amputation, Castration, and Masculinity in To Have and Have Not.” In One Man Alone: Hemingway and To Have and Have Not. Ed. Toni D. Knott. New York: University Press of America, 1999. 155-172.
  • “Ernest Hemingway and the Mirror of Manhood: Fetishism, Transvestism, Homeovestism, and Perverse Méconnaissance.” Arizona Quarterly 54.3 (1998): 27-68.
  • “Rabbit Stew and Blowing Dorothy’s Bridges: Love, Aggression, and Fetishism in For Whom the Bell Tolls.” Twentieth Century Literature 44.2 (1998): 204-218.
  • “‘The Ogre’ and the ‘Beautiful Thing’: Voyeurism, Exhibitionism, and the Image of Woman in the Poetry of William Carlos Williams.” The William Carlos Williams Review 22.2 (1996): 29-45.

Carl Eby joined the faculty of Appalachian State University in 2013. Prior to his appointment at ASU, he taught at the University of California Davis, at Michigan State University, and at the University of South Carolina Beaufort, where he chaired the Department of English and Theatre, and where he was twice named professor of the year. Dr. Eby is the author of Hemingway’s Fetishism: Psychoanalysis and the Mirror of Manhood (SUNY Press, 1999) and numerous articles on the life and work of Ernest Hemingway. Dr. Eby served for many years on the Board of Trustees of the Ernest Hemingway Foundation and is currently working on a book about Hemingway’s posthumous novel, The Garden of Eden.

Dr. Eby teaches courses on 19th- and 20th-century American literature, transatlantic Modernism, and African American literature. He has twice been a finalist for the South Carolina Governor’s Professor of the Year and the recipient of the South Carolina Governor’s Distinguished Professor Award. In 2009 he was awarded a Carolina Trustee Professorship.

Title: Professor
Department: Department of English

Email address: Email me

Phone: (828) 262-2156

Office address
200 Sanford Hall